Schenzel Community Center in North Omaha offers new program for seniors to connect

The impact of the pandemic has been hard on the elderly. Many remained isolated and unable to communicate with others. “I couldn’t go anywhere because being a senior this virus was very, very difficult,” said Lloyd Pendleton Jr. of 30 people attending a new senior center in North Omaha at the community center in Schenzel near 20th Street and Willis Avenue. said Bessie Howard. She enjoys participating in socializing, games, meals and outreach. “We just made Valentine’s Day baskets for about 75 kids here.” .He says there is a lack of senior centers in the North Omaha area. “And bringing[the elderly]together, sitting at the table and listening to this wealth of knowledge, has been a gift to me.” “We provide services to the needy and children who feel they have no one to go to,” Howard said. Seniors push themselves physically, with exercise. And push themselves emotionally. bingo because I’m a frequent winner so I love coming here,” Pendleton said. “It’s a home away from home for three hours. the Schenzel Center community. All are welcome.

The impact of the pandemic has been severe on the elderly.

Many remained isolated and unable to communicate with others.

“I couldn’t go anywhere because being an elderly person this virus was very, very difficult,” said Lloyd Pendleton Jr.

He is one of 30 people attending a new senior center in North Omaha at the Schenzel Community Center near 20th Street and Willis Avenue.

“We’re more than babysitters. We’re grandparents who like to hang out and mingle and do things in the community,” Bessie Howard said.

She enjoys participating in socializing, games, meals and evangelism.

“We just made Valentine’s Day baskets for about 75 kids here.”

Pastor Ed King directs the Hope Center for Kids, which is connected to the Schenzel Community Center.

He says there is a lack of senior centers in the North Omaha area.

“And bringing (the seniors) together, sitting at the table and listening to this wealth of knowledge, has been a gift to me.”

“We provide services to the needy and to children who feel like they have no one to turn to,” Howard said.

Seniors push themselves physically, with exercise.

And push yourself emotionally.

Get out of this “pandemic mindset” to make a difference.

And they have fun doing it.

“I love bingo because I’m a frequent winner, so I like coming here,” Pendleton said.

“It’s a home away from home for three hours.”

The senior group meets every Tuesday and Thursday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Schenzel Community Center.

Everyone is welcome to join.

Jill E. Washington