10 U.S. hospitals spending the least on community investment compared to tax breaks, according to Lown’s ranking

Seventy-two percent of the country’s private, nonprofit hospitals had a fair deficit in 2018, meaning they spent less on charitable care and community investments than they received in tax exemptions, according to a report released on July 12 by the nonpartisan health care think tank, the Lown. Institute.

The Lown Institute calculated fair spending for 2,391 private, nonprofit hospitals by comparing each hospital’s spending on charitable care and community investments to the value of its tax breaks, using data from Hospital Cost Reports from 2018 from CMS.

Below are the 10 US hospitals with the largest fair deficits:

1. Cleveland Clinic
-Equitable deficit of $261 million
Spending on community benefits is 1.4% of total spending

2. NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital (New York)
-Fair deficit of $237 million
Expenses for the benefit of the community represent 1.9% of total expenses

3. UCSF Medical Center (San Francisco)
-Fair deficit of $208 million
Spending on community benefits is 0.9% of total spending

4. Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston)
-Fair deficit of $179 million
Community spending represents 1.2% of total spending

5. University of Michigan Health System (Ann Arbor)
-Fair deficit of $169 million
Expenses for the benefit of the community represent 1.1% of total expenses

6. NYU Langone Medical Center (New York)
-Fair deficit of $163 million
Community spending represents 2.5% of total spending

7. Vanderbilt University Medical Center (Nashville, Tennessee)
-Fair deficit of $157 million
Expenses for the benefit of the community represent 2.3% of total expenses

8. Brigham and Women’s Hospital (Boston)
-Fair deficit of $142 million
Spending on community benefits is 1% of total spending

9. Penn Medicine (Philadelphia)
-Fair deficit of $142 million
Spending on community benefits is 0.5% of total spending

ten. Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (Los Angeles)
-Fair deficit of $138 million
Spending on community benefits is 1.6% of total spending

Jill E. Washington